David Troness... Engineering Elegance
 
 

I am not just talking about “engineering” cars, planes and computers.  I see these as important criteria to judge the value of any creation; from to bridges to banking systems, from semiconductors to supply chains and from o-rings to organizational structures.


One set of skills, TRIZ (Russian acronym for the
theory of inventive problem solving) has intrigued and motivated me ever since I heard about it in the early 90‘s.  Now, working with my friend and colleague, Larry Ball, I have had the opportunity to learn a much more focused way of applying of the TRIZ tools and methods.  At the same time, I am providing minor contributions to Larry’s book, “TRIZ Power Tools: How to Systematically Tackle Tough Problems”.  You can download a free e-version of the book at www.OpenSourceTRIZ.com






Video introduction  to TRIZ


Other Resources: books, articles, videos







November 6-7, 2012  TRIZ: Taking Six-Sigma to Another Level This will be a two-day class, to be held in Akron, Ohio, within the University of Akron’s Polymer Training Center.



Inventive Problem Solving with TRIZ                       

I will be teaching this at the U of W’s School of Continuing Education in Milwaukee.





Engineering Projects in Community Service”  EPICS originated at Purdue University and is now an exciting new endeavor at Arizona State University’s Ira A. Fulton School of Engineering.  I am a “corporate innovation mentor” to one of the student teams, which is developing an iPad application that non-profits can use to solve their toughest problems, with TRIZ of course.  The team will act as “social entrepreneurs”, while also making money for further development by selling the app on iTunes.



Check out these LinkedIn Groups:


Planting TRIZ

Created: December 09, 2009 | Professional Organization | Members: 10

A place for bringing people and ideas together to find practical ways of introducing TRIZ to high school and unversity-age students. If you are already doing it in some form, it would be great if you could share your "lessons learned". The intent is for this to be a "think-and-do tank". Please don't consider this as a forum for you to market your software or consulting services. Goal: Increase the number and skill level of students in the area of creating "elegant" solutions to tough problems. In this case, "elegant" refers to solutions which are simple, low-cost and without compromises. We should not assume that it is only about TRIZ or classical TRIZ, or that it take the form of a separate course or module as part of a school's curriculum. We don't consider anyone to be THE expert. Everyone's ideas are valuable.

 

About Me



My career has gone from lawn-mowing to delivering papers to flipping hamburgers, to bagging groceries, to guiding people through Yellowstone park, to working with mentally retarded children, to working with the elderly, to working with drug abusers, to working with troubled teen-agers, to owning and managing a woodworking retail store, to the controlling the production of mechanized garbage trucks, to developing  computer simulations to improve semiconductor manufacturing systems, to teaching engineers around the world on the effective use of reliability engineering methods and tools, to improving aerospace manufacturing processes... and finally to my current job within aerospace engineering and product development.  Specifically, I coach and use various skills to pursue “engineering elegance”... and I love it.


Education (formal & informal)

  1. -Theology

  2. -Social Work

  3. -Psychology

  4. -Organizational Development

  5. -Industrial Engineering

  6. -Reliability Engineering

  7. -Inventive Problem Solving

  8. -Innovation Processes


 

Criteria for “Engineering Elegance”

Simple
Low-Cost
No Compromises

TRIZ Practitioner's Exchange

Created: May 20, 2009 | Professional Organization | Members: 92

This is not another conference. In fact, there will be no abstracts, no papers, no presentations, no sales pitches and no bragging. Exchange events focus on the unique needs of industry practitioners. Many of these needs are best be filled by other practitioners. Instead of coming to a conference to hear what others think you need, the attendees drive events with their questions. We ask everyone to come prepared to share the questions they need answers to. Specifically consider subjects related to TRIZ deployment, training, theory and how to apply TRIZ to real work problems.